Cannibalism rituals of Mexican Xiximes tribe proved after discovery of human bones cache

The Xiximes tribe of Northern Mexico was known for their continual fighting with neighboring tribes.  Jesuit missionaries wrote about the cannibalism they witnessed in the Xiximes tribe, but no physical evidence was ever found.  Gavin Allen of the Daily Mail writes about the discovery of human bones believed to be from the victims of cannibalism.

A cache of cooked and and carved human bones has been discovered in Mexico – backing up stories that cannibalism was practised by an ancient tribe.Cannibalism rituals of Mexican Xiximes tribe proved after discovery of human bones cache

 

The bones were found in El Salto, Durango State, northern Mexico, in a cave hamlet built into a cliff.

 

The site – called Cueva del Maguey – dates back to around 1425 and was formerly home to the Xiximes tribe.

 

The archaeological trove included more than three dozen human bones which showed evidence of having been defleshed, cooked and then ritualistically marked with stone blades.

Rumours of cannibalism among the 5,000-strong Xiximes have long existed due to the historical accounts of Jesuit missionaries, which labelled the tribe ‘the wildest and most barbarian people of the New World’.

Read more of the article at Cannibalism rituals of Mexican Xiximes tribe proved after discovery of human bones cache | Mail Online.

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