History Gift Guide – More History Movies

History Gift Guide – More History Movies

Here are some more history movies that just couldn’t be left off of a list.

Here’s a list of some more best selling History movies!

[amazon_link id=”B004TJ1H2S” target=”_blank” container=”” container_class=”” ]Platoon[/amazon_link]

Winner of 4 Academy Awards, including Best Picture, and based on the first-hand experience of Oscar-winning director Oliver Stone, Platoon is powerful, intense and starkly brutal. “Harrowingly realistic and completely convincing” (Leonard Maltin), it is “a dark, unforgettable memorial” (The Washington Post) to every soldier whose innocence was lost in the war-torn jungles of Vietnam.

[amazon_link id=”B000G0O5N2″ target=”_blank” container=”” container_class=”” ]Black Hawk Down[/amazon_link]

From acclaimed director Ridley Scott and renowned producer Jerry Bruckheimer comes a gripping true story about bravery, camaradarie and the complex reality of war. Black Hawk Down stars an exceptional cast including Josh Hartnett, Ewan McGregor, Tom Sizemore, Eric Bana, William Fichtner, Ewen Bremner and Sam Shepard. In 1993, an elite group of American Rangers and Delta Force soldiers are sent to Somalia on a critical mission to capture a violent warlord whose corrupt regime has lead to the starvation of hundreds of thousands of Somalis. When the mission goes terribly wrong, the men find themselves outnumbered and literally fighting for their lives.

[amazon_link id=”B00275EGX8″ target=”_blank” container=”” container_class=”” ]Hurt Locker[/amazon_link]

The making of honest action movies has become so rare that Kathryn Bigelow’s magnificent The Hurt Locker was shown mostly in art cinemas rather than multiplexes. That’s fine; the picture is a work of art. But it also delivers more kinetic excitement, more breath-bating suspense, more putting-you-right-there in the danger zone than all the brain-dead, visually incoherent wrecking derbies hogging mall screens. Partly it’s a matter of subject. The movie focuses on an Explosive Ordnance Disposal team, the guys whose more or less daily job is to disarm the homemade bombs that have accounted for most U.S. casualties in Iraq. But even more, the film’s extraordinary tension derives from the precision and intelligence of Bigelow’s direction.

[amazon_link id=”B003UESJJC” target=”_blank” container=”” container_class=”” ]Apocalypse Now[/amazon_link]

In the tradition of such obsessively driven directors as Erich von Stroheim and Werner Herzog, Francis Ford Coppola approached the production of Apocalypse Now as if it were his own epic mission into the heart of darkness. On location in the storm-ravaged Philippines, he quite literally went mad as the project threatened to devour him in a vortex of creative despair, but from this insanity came one of the greatest films ever made. It began as a John Milius screenplay, transposing Joseph Conrad’s classic story “Heart of Darkness” into the horrors of the Vietnam War, following a battle-weary Captain Willard (Martin Sheen) on a secret upriver mission to find and execute the renegade Colonel Kurtz (Marlon Brando), who has reverted to a state of murderous and mystical insanity. The journey is fraught with danger involving wartime action on epic and intimate scales.

[amazon_link id=”B000PAAJVA” target=”_blank” container=”” container_class=”” ]The Patriot[/amazon_link]

In 1776 South Carolina, widower and legendary war hero Benjamin Martin (Mel Gibson) finds himself thrust into the midst of the American Revolutionary War as he helplessly watches his family torn apart by the savage forces of the British Redcoats. Unable to remain silent, he recruits a band of reluctant volunteers, including his idealistic patriot son, Gabriel (Heath Ledger), to take up arms against the British. Fighting to protect his family’s freedom and his country’s independence, Martin discovers the pain of betrayal, the redemption of revenge and the passion of love.

[amazon_link id=”B001DJ7PNW” target=”_blank” container=”” container_class=”” ]JFK[/amazon_link]

That fateful day in Dallas set in motion a sequence of events that would only intensify the mystery behind Kennedy’s death, causing New Orleans District Attorney Jim Garrison (Kevin Costner) to begin an investigation that would gradually become a personal obsession. Bravura filmmaking combined with controversial treatment of historical facts and audacious speculation, this breathtaking revision of history presents a mesmerizing parade of shady figures and conspiracy theories, unfolding like a classic mystery based on history’s greatest unsolved crime. A technical triumph boasting Oscar-winning cinematography and editing, Stone’s film is guaranteed to grab the viewer’s attention with its daring take on the JFK controversy.

[amazon_link id=”B000UJ48UO” target=”_blank” container=”” container_class=”” ]Full Metal Jacket[/amazon_link]

Stanley Kubrick’s 1987, penultimate film seemed to a lot of people to be contrived and out of touch with the ’80s vogue for such intensely realistic portrayals of the Vietnam War as Platoon and The Deer Hunter. Certainly, Kubrick gave audiences plenty of reason to wonder why he made the film at all: essentially a two-part drama that begins on a Parris Island boot camp for rookie Marines and abruptly switches to Vietnam (actually shot on sound stages and locations near London), Full Metal Jacket comes across as a series of self-contained chapters in a story whose logical and thematic development is oblique at best.

[amazon_link id=”B001TOCCRU” target=”_blank” container=”” container_class=”” ]Doctor Zhivago[/amazon_link]

David Lean’s Doctor Zhivago is an exploration of the Russian Revolution as seen from the point of view of the intellectual, introspective title character (Omar Sharif). As the political landscape changes, and the Czarist regime comes to an end, Dr.Zhivago’s relationships reflect the political turmoil raging about him. Though he is married, the vagaries of war lead him to begin a love affair with the beautiful Lara (Julie Christie). But he cannot escape the machinations of a band of selfish and cruel characters: General Strelnikov (Tom Courtenay), a Bolshevik General; Komarovsky (Rod Steiger), Lara’s former lover; and Yevgraf (Alec Guinness), Zhivago’s sinister half-brother. This epic, sweeping romance, told in flashback, captures the lushness of Moscow before the war and the violent social upheaval that followed. The film is based on the Pulitzer Prize-winning novel by Boris Pasternak.

[amazon_link id=”B001SARO9Q” target=”_blank” container=”” container_class=”” ]All the President’s Men[/amazon_link]

In the Watergate Building, lights go on and four burglars are caught in the act. That night triggered revelations that drive a U.S. President from office. Washington reporters Bob Woodward (Robert Redford) and Carl Bernstein (Dustin Hoffman) grabbed the story and stayed with it through doubts, denials and discouragement. All the President’s Men is their story. Directed by Alan J. Pakula and based on the Woodward/Bernstein book, the film won four 1976 Academy Awards. It also explores a working newspaper, where the mission is to get the story – and get it right.

[amazon_link id=”B001P829VY” target=”_blank” container=”” container_class=”” ]The Treasure of the Sierra Madre[/amazon_link]

Gold in the hills, avarice in the hearts of men. Two hard-luck drifters (Humphrey Bogart and Tim Holt) and a grizzled prospector (Walter Huston) discover gold. Then greed and paranoia set in. John Huston won Academy Awards for his direction and screenplay. And his dad took the Best Supporting Actor Oscar. Without awards, but with enduring acclaim, is Bogart’s performance, transforming from a likable hobo to a heartless thug simmering in greed. Treasures place on the American Film Institute’s Top 100 American Films list reaffirms it’s still a powerful movie.

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